Tag Archives | Varroa
Michael Bush, the Practical Beekeeper, will give a talk in Vancouver, B.C. on Oct. 18, sponsored by the Richmoind Beekeepers Association. Photo credit: Youtube.com

Michael Bush, the Practical Beekeeper, to give seminar in Vancouver Oct. 18

Michael Bush, the Nebraska beekeeper and author of such useful books as “The Practical Beekeeper” and “Beekeeping Naturally” will be in Vancouver next month. Regularly sought for his knowledge and simple ways of dealing with honey bees, Bush has also made something of a business of reproducing out-of-print publications from early beekeepers, such as Francis […]

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Dusting a hive with icing sugar. One method of testing for varroa mite levels. At the BCHPA convention, we'll get an update on other methods of testing and treating for this little, but powerful pest. (Photo credit: Jeff Lee)

Why beekeepers should not miss the BC Honey Producers convention this month

As a beekeeper, the end of summer and the harkening fall remind me of the approaching B.C. Honey Producers Association fall convention September 25-27 at the Delta Airport Inn in Richmond. I watch the calendar with particular interest and count the days to the start of the three-day event. As associations go, the BCHPA is […]

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Marla Spivak, entomologist and honey bee researcher who developed the Minnesota Hygeinic strain of mite-clearing bees. Photo courtesy of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

Marla Spivak, Eric Mussen, Dewey Caron & others at BCHPA 2014 convention

I always look forward to the annual B.C. Honey Producers’ Association convention for two reasons. The first, but not most important one is that it comes towards the end of a season of heavy lifting. The approach of the AGM and its popular education day are signs that the frenetic summertime workload of looking after […]

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Flying bee on lavender

Importation of U.S. Package Bees divisive among Canadian beekeepers

The deadline for public comment on the Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s Risk Assessment on the importation of American package bees has now passed. But that hasn’t stopped the considerable commentary from beekeepers who are weighing in on both sides, who alternately find the CFIA “status quo” decision either specious and based on faulty science, or […]

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An apiary in British Columbia.

Canada to keep border closed to U.S. honey bee packages: report

Canadian beekeepers hoping for quick access to cheaper package bees from the United States have had their hopes dented, if not crushed. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency has concluded a new risk assessment report that says Canadian apiculture remains exposed to the potential for medication-resistant varroa mites and American Foulbrood, and infestations of small hive […]

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Bald-faced Hornet and wasps

How we’re battling wasps and hornets around bee hives

Beekeepers face a dizzying array of pests, diseases and threats to their livestock. We spend an enormous amount of time battling the varroa mite and being on guard for American Foulbrood disease, nosema, small hive beetle and Africanized honey bees. Fortunately in our region of Western Canada we don’t have the last two problems. Yet. […]

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Carniolan hybrid honey bee queen

Installing new honey bee queens from B.C.’s best breeders

We’re back right as rain, just as the rain hits. I managed to install new honey bee queens in a number of hives last night, fixing a self-inflicted problem that started when I de-queened the hives as part of an experiment in treating for mites. Stupid me, I then killed almost all of the banked […]

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Photo courtesy of http://www.bluesci.org/

Disaster strikes in our apiary, and his name is Jeff

The lessons we learn as beekeepers are supposed to help us. I recently made a catastrophic mistake that also cost us a bundle and lost us some very good queens. Like many beekeepers in British Columbia, we take our honey off around the middle of August. Anything the bees collect after that is meant for […]

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