Tag Archives | Varroa
Small Hive Beetle larvae infecting a honey comb. Photo courtesy of OMAFRA.

Alberta Small Hive Beetle find means trouble for B.C. beekeepers

Small Hive Beetle, a nasty little pest that B.C. has already had a small taste of, has raised its ugly head in Alberta. And, as seems to be the case so often these days, it is as a result of hitching a ride with an unsuspecting beekeeper. The situation in this case is much more […]

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Bee season in British Columbia starts, for many of us, with sending our deadouts through Iotron Industries' electron beam sterilizer. It kills all of the pathogens left in the boxes. Of course, we don't do this with overwintered colonies! Jeff Lee Photo

Bee Season Upon Us With Early Iotron Run

Who would have thought that beekeeping could be so complicated? The honey bees aren’t really even flying right now, other than some exploratory flights looking for early pollen. But it seems that the work of getting these little perishers ready for the new season starts early. So early, in fact, that I took this week […]

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Small hive beetle are seen in a hive among bees. Aethina tumida is native to South Africa, where it is regarded as a minor pest of African strains of honey bees. However, in the United States, where the beetle was first discovered in 1988, it has become a significant pest of non-Africanized strains of honey bees. Larvae of the small hive beetle are most damaging to honey bees. They tunnel through combs, eating honey and pollen and killing bee brood, ruining the combs.

Four apiary sites in B.C.’s Fraser Valley found with small hive beetles

Provincial bee inspectors in British Columbia have discovered three more apiaries along the Canada-U.S. border with adult small hive beetles since the discovery of a single beetle on August 24. The discoveries, which provincial apiculturist Paul van Westendorp said are likely not the last, have resulted in several overlapping quarantine zones between Abbotsford and Langley. […]

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Small hive beetle are seen in a hive among bees. Aethina tumida is native to South Africa, where it is regarded as a minor pest of African strains of honey bees. However, in the United States, where the beetle was first discovered in 1988, it has become a significant pest of non-Africanized strains of honey bees. Larvae of the small hive beetle are most damaging to honey bees. They tunnel through combs, eating honey and pollen and killing bee brood, ruining the combs.

Small Hive Beetle found in B.C. triggers inspection plan

Beekeepers in British Columbia have just joined a less-than-illustrious club, the Small Hive Beetle club, with the discovery of a single adult in a honey bee colony in Abbotsford. The discovery, made August 24 and confirmed on August 27, is the first recorded instance of the sub-Saharan beetle in the province. I’ve written a story […]

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Amanda out in one of our apiaries in Metro area. Where's the snow? Photo: Jeff Lee

Late-winter feeding of the bees as spring draws near

We spent much of the weekend out with the bees, making those important late-winter checks to see who had survived and who had not. Some are thriving. But not a few are struggling. What made this weekend both enjoyable and worrisome was the extraordinarily mild weather. February can be a tough month here, both rainy […]

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Applying oxalic acid in vapour form. I use a Heilyser Technologies vapourizer attached to a 12-volt car battery. Acid is in the bottle on top of the hive, purchased from a chemist. (Photo: Amanda Goodman Lee)

Treating bees with oxalic acid; a late-winter mite-killing exercise

It’s the beginning of February and we’re just starting to get busy for the start of the new season. If you are like me, you will have a long list of unfinished chores from the fall. From cleaning up and repairing boxes and equipment to finishing those ambitious workshop projects that are supposed to make […]

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Honey bee with Deformed Wing Virus, next to a healthy bee. Photo credit: www.omafra.gov.on.ca

On Deformed Wing Virus, feeding & treating with formic acid

Last week, as we were getting ready to treat our colonies for varroa, Amanda discovered one that had Deformed Wing Virus. It is a particularly heartbreaking disease to find, since the predominant physical issue is that the bees have either shrivelled wings or no wings at all. Watching a wingless bee crawl around on the […]

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Michael Bush, the Practical Beekeeper, will give a talk in Vancouver, B.C. on Oct. 18, sponsored by the Richmoind Beekeepers Association. Photo credit: Youtube.com

Michael Bush, the Practical Beekeeper, to give seminar in Vancouver Oct. 18

Michael Bush, the Nebraska beekeeper and author of such useful books as “The Practical Beekeeper” and “Beekeeping Naturally” will be in Vancouver next month. Regularly sought for his knowledge and simple ways of dealing with honey bees, Bush has also made something of a business of reproducing out-of-print publications from early beekeepers, such as Francis […]

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